Monday, December 13, 2010

Into light

Above, the interior of Terrasol on Polk Street in San Francisco, presided over when we visited by a young man so jolly it seemed as if he could be Santa Claus in 40 years.


Above, An installation of mosaic eggs by Robert James in a run-down part of Market Street, part of a program of The Artery funded by the S.F. Art Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Across all the cultures and religions in the Northern hemisphere are celebrations of light in the darkest days - It's fascinating -literally hypnotic-  the dazzling surfaces presented by the reflective, faceted surfaces of ornaments, as if staring into this dissolving radiance could take one right out of materiality, time and civilization and its discontents.

13 comments:

Cindy said...

Beautiful pictures, I love the idea that "staring into this dissolving radiance could take one right out of materiality, time and civilization and its discontents."
This is such an incredible time of year, thank you for this.
:)

Celeste Bergin said...

people will always celebrate beauty. Thanks for sharing what you found

Charles Gramlich said...

So many gorgeous images at this time of year.

Eva said...

That street scene is a great pic! The light is so different in winter, maybe because of the low sun -- it comes sneaking much deeper into our living room than in summer, and it is not kept away by the trees -- a little compensation for the colder days.

grrl + dog said...

of course..

the shiny stuff... to remind themof the light coming just at the solstice.

Duh..

only just made that connection..

Titus said...

Love the mosaic eggs! Gaudi-esque, and what is it about the egg shape that makes us love it so!

I remember being at Tintern Abbey on a moonless December night and marvelling at just how black the night really is in Winter. You could not see your own hands, let alone feet. No wonder we light our torches and celebrate!

Can't help but share a discontent, Mr Cohen:
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in.

Titus said...

Not quite light, more source, but this is BBC Radio 4's Book of the Week.

Once upon a time we thought that we were the centre of the universe and that even the sun revolved around us...
Thousands of years later we know that our earliest, most basic idea about our place in the cosmos was false, and that that cosmos is vastly larger than we ever dreamed. We are mere specks..."

Richard Cohen took eight years to write his account of the sun. The sun's biography, in fact. He looks at the myth, the legend, the science. Also the social context and how the sun figures in various art forms. And, will it be with us for ever? We have to hope so. His celebration of that gold disc in the sky is now caught in five epsiodes...

In the first of five episodes, abridged by Penny Leicester, the author highlights some
of the astounding myths associated with the sun, then he views the pefect sunrise...

Can you get iPlayer in the US?

Clowncar said...

such a very pretty last sentence. it hangs at the end of the paragraph like a bright Christmas ornament.

Hence72 said...

excellent stuff as always

dont forget to pop over for a visit soon

ArtSparker said...

Titus-I don't know, I would have to ask a more computer-savvy friend. Thanks for your two (!) very thoughtful comments.

Gwilym Williams said...

The welcome sight of the reindeer dragging the sledge loaded with yulelogs and the oak-mistletoe cut down with the gold knife. Huddle round and I'll tell you a story.
"Once it was when the light was put to the tinder that our shadows danced in the trees and there came ..."

Tammie Lee said...

when I lived in Santa Barbara there were many of these eggs. Some in yards and some in the city. I always enjoyed seeing them. I wonder if it is the same artist, or simply the same idea expressed in another town.

Emma J said...

Lovely, lovely, lovely. Thanks for this.