Sunday, May 9, 2010

Exit, pursued by a Storm

Strange how this ship is running before the weather, isn't it? Sure seems like there are a lot of things to worry about right now. Is this why post- apocalyptic fiction is such a pleasure? Relax, let your hair down, no need to keep up appearances when floating in the warm sea of chaos. I remember particularly enjoying it as a teenager. How about you - what did you read as a teenager (AKA young adult)?

22 comments:

Jasmine said...

What an interesting picture. Some times decay can bring a new expression, a new form of beauty. This picture certainly speaks.

Fresca said...

Yeah, when I was a teenager I loved dark, deep, and disturbing stuff--"Apocalypse Now" and "Interview with the Vampire."

Maybe those types of stories about horror are like training to handle (mitigate the effects of) the nightly news?

I still like a *good* post-apocalypse, like "28 Days Later."

Cláudia said...

Ops, when I was a teenager all I read was sugary novels (yeah, Mills and Boon...). Apocalyptic stuff terrified me!
Thanks to Jane Austen I could move forward into more interesting and high quality literature.

ArtSparker said...

C- I also read Gothic Romances, I have to confess, those books where there was a teetery old night time house/castle with one window lit on the cover...

Shayna Prentice said...

The ship does seem as though the weather is following it. I see the head of a lamb-like creature there in the clouds, perhaps warding off turbulence? Ahh, books.
I read most all of L. Frank Baum's original Oz tales; Wuthering Heights; Poetry; Nancy Drew; Trixie Belden; Foxfire books; James Herriot; Bradford Angier; Carson McCullers; James Thurber, etc ... thanks for taking me back, Susan.

ArtSparker said...

Shayna– we never broke up...Oh. I see a lot of drama around me, heh.

My mother got me on to the Oz books at an early age, including the follow up Ruth Plumy Thompson books, yes Nancy Drew, James Thurber was a towering household god in my family.

Shayna Prentice said...

ohhh ... drama !
You know the Oz books ~!~ I don't know about RP Thompson ... must scout her out now. And yes, I love what you said about the deification of Thurber in your household - I so get it! Also, for a time there I loved to pretend that I was Nancy Drew. I worked on a mystery in my neighborhood - it had to do with a pink house and a red string hanging from a nail.

ArtSparker said...

Shayna - I remember once at about age ten pretending to be Sherlock Homes and leading the other kids around the neighborhood, but with no ability to engineer a plot, I could not figure out how to conclude the mystery.

Shayna Prentice said...

Susan ~ I can just see you Sherlocking around the neighborhood! Fantastic. (I had a friend back then who nicknamed me "Sherlock Shayna" because I was always investigating things, hah!) I wish you could have been along with me on my red string caper. (I was convinced the string was red because it had been soaked in blood.)

JJ Beazley said...

You're all mad. No sane teenager would be caught dead reading.Teenagers have far better things to do, and they know it all anyway. At least, I did. I read a few ghost stories - aloud to my friends occasionally, on the nights when the girls were washing their hair. Or so they said.

The ship is running before the storm because it's a bit of modern technology, and modern technology is constantly trying to keep ahead of the mess it makes.

(I didn't know that as a teenager. Blow me! Wonder if there's anything else I didn't know.)

I came to Sherlock Holmes late in life, and kept finding holes in his logic. I also found his asexuality a bit odd. Just one Irene Adler? Weird. Did you know that 221B Baker Street is a branch of Santander Bank? Maybe I'm missing something.

ArtSparker said...

J.J. - Sherlock Holmes was probably a high functioning autistic, assuming he he is no longer alive.

Santander backwars is rednatnas. It's a Clue, as I am sure Shayna will agree.

Clowncar said...

I loved HG Wells sci fi as a YA. The Time Machine. Food of the Gods. War of the Worlds (that opening paragraph still resonates).

Vonnegut too. He's perfect for high school ennui.

Had nevber thought of Holmes as an autistic. Makes sense.

Shayna Prentice said...

Oh, yes I do agree, Susan. (I have a secret decoder, too. *shhh) Hey there Jeff - tell us a ghost story?

ArtSparker said...

CC- Yes, I liked Vonnegut too.

JJ Beazley said...

‘Brilliant, Holmes’

‘Not really, old fellow. I saw immediately that Santander is Rednatnas spelt backwards, and my unerring eye for detail soon spotted that Rednatnas is an anagram of Stand Near. Once I had made those two vital deductions, the rest was simple.’

‘But Holmes, isn’t Santander an anagram of Stand Near, too?’

‘Go away, Watson. I want to think about Irene. That woman’s got balls.’

‘Well actually, old chap...’

Shay: would you like a gothic ghost story or a modern, more subtle one?

grrl + dog said...

I did read the Posiedon Adventure

back then,

nothing like the movie, but still

apocolyptic.

And all those John Wyndham sci fi stories...*shiver*

ArtSparker said...

D– Yes, Day of the Triffids, there was also a writer called John Christopher who wrote a lot of bizarre stuff.

Clowncar said...

Day of the Trifids! Yay!

Also Village of the Damned, another Wyndham classic (the Midwitch Cookoos was the book, I believe).

Titus said...

Mainly the comic 2000AD, and anything about factual crime I could find (not such a genre in those days and far harder to find). Lots of books on Africa and the Slave Trade, as that was one of my father's big interests. Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" at least once a month.
Was also a member of the Illuminatus! Trilogy fanclub at school (membership: 2 - and I don't think either of us really understood it but it made us think we were clever, and the books are very funny). I also loved Asterix the Gaul.
Lots of flashbacks to me at 13 now, so signing off rapidly.

Kaetlyn Wilcox said...

I was all about Toni Morrison ALL THE TIME. I would read and reread everything she wrote over and over and over again. Now that I think of it, I must have been kind of a pill....

Fresca said...

Favorite dark-themed Vonnegut:
"Slaughterhouse 5"--it inspired me to give an oral report in ninth grade on the bombing of Dresden

What a cheerful child I was...

Favorite dark-themed Sherlock Holmes:
"The Speckled Band."

Holmes is Spock (another ASD type) in Victorian disguise.

ArtSparker said...

Fresca - I remember being absolutely thrilled when Star Trek replicated the scene Where Watson has been shot and Holmes becomes emotional with Kirk and Spock, "Jim! Jim!"