Friday, July 23, 2010

What are you reading?

...Also looking for DVD (film) recommendations.

26 comments:

kathrin said...

I love old books !!! have a nice weekend ! big hugh Kathrin

Charles Gramlich said...

Dark and disorderly by Bernita Harris and Slick time by O'Neil De Noux. Both good books.

Tomás Serrano said...

Cormac McCarthy´s "Blood Meridian". My last was "No Beast so Fierce" by Edward Bunker. The film is disappointing, I think.

Chris David Richards said...

I just finished reading Beckett's Malone Dies, although I wouldn't really recommend it to anyone. It's good, in its way.

The best book I've read recently is The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. The sort of book you can give to your friends and say 'read this' and watch them come back in tears.

RA said...

I love all kinds of books: from farytales to scientific descriptions of the weirdest things! :)
At the moment I am re-reading (my third time around)Clarissa Pinkola Estés' "Women Who Run With the Wolves". It's a wonderful book and I recommend it warmly. Or, what do you think of: "The wild woman carries with her the bundles of healing; she carries everything a woman needs to be and know. She carries the medicine for all things."
:)

Poet in Residence said...

I'm a hard reader to please. I finish perhaps 1 in 10 of the books I start.
I've started reading 'Lost in the Funhouse' by John Barth (Bantam Windstone). I found the first story 'Night-Sea Journey' compulsive reading.
Barth supplies what we call food for thought and I like that in a writer. The Boston Globe says Barth is an artist malgre´ lui." The Washington Post admires Barth's "muscular Anglo-Saxon locutions".
Shall I dare to think I shall read a whole book?

ger said...

I´m reading thrift-store books these days - I read them, enjoy them, put them on the stairs down in the hallway for someone else to read, forget them - nice slim method...

Giulia said...

A lot. But I always re-read Gatsby every summer...

Jasmine said...

Mostly Slinky Malinki and similar tales these days :)

Titus said...

A. N. Wilson's "God's Funeral" (good for last thing at night - nice to drift off to), Steven Weinberg's "Dreams of a Final Theory" (beautiful, somewhat sad), "To Kill A Mockingbird" because of the anniversary and Hugh McMillan's "The Lost Garden" which is wonderfully written and illustrated as well being a lesson in the origami of making books.

DVD - "Belleville Rendez-vous", which may have been "The Triplets of Belleville" in the US. You cannot watch it enough times!

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

I just finished re-reading Jane Eyre. It was wonderful.
Also loved Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese.

As for DVDs.... An Education was my favourite movie of all last year!

Sweetpea said...

Just watched a fabulous documentary called "Herb & Dorothy"....

Listening to an audio book at the moment, "The Language of Bees" by Laurie King, written from the perspective of Sherlock Holmes' wife...quite, quite marvey!

Totalfeckineejit said...

I find it very hard to read books or anything more than 40 lines long, I guess that's why I edit a poetry magazine (OO get me!how dya like the sound o that?)
That said, I am trying to read 'The Picture Of Dorian Gray'it's a great story but the writing is more flowery than a country garden.

I recommend you buy any book by Salt publishing because they are brilliant and struggling http://www.saltpublishing.com/

Titus said...

Been racking my brain for this film title all night. Only seen it once and now I've remembered, I'm going to buy the DVD!

It's "La Kermesse héroïque", or the Carnival in Flanders. Brilliant and very funny.

Fresca said...

1. Researching Iroquois culture, I read the novel "Turtle Belly" by Joel Monture, a Mohawk writer, about a Mohawk boy growing up. It was worth reading.

2. And then I hopped west across the continent and re-watched one of my favorite films, "Smoke Signals" about two young men growing up on a Coeur d'Alene rez, based on a short story by Sherman Alexie.

3. A novel I reread every few years (and this was one of the years) that I think *you* specifically might like is "Fludd" by English writer Hilary Mantel.
It's about a mysterious visitor to a bleak town and the oddly liberating (?) effects he has on some of the population. Sort of a down-the-rabbit-hole trip down the via negativa.

tabs4959 said...

I always read and re-read "The Collected Stories of Flannery O'Connor." Nothing like a good Catholic girl with lupus writing about the south. My favorite DVD is "Why Man Creates," by Saul Bass and Simon Mayo. This little film won the Oscar for Documentary short Subject in 1968. I saw this movie that same year, when I was 10 years old. It changed my life in every way possible and continues to color my viewpoints to this day.

Megan said...

A Gambling Man: Charles II's Restoration Game. Fun so far. I forgot that Pepys was on the boat that brought him back...

Eva said...

I'm reading using instructions for my new cell phone

Deb G said...

Maps of the Imagination by Peter Turchi. About to start Sherlock in Love by Sena Jeter Naslund. I always tend to read something non-fiction and fiction at the same time.

ArtSparker said...

Thanks for all the recommendations- It's clear there is quite a range of tastes among the people who read the blog.

Cobalt Violet said...

Still obsessing on Italy so I am reading La Bella Lingua. A lot of interesting fun history and culture not only of the language but the art, food and music ... The obsession continues ... :)

Emma J said...

Home by Marilynne Robison - the other, mirror image of her phenomenal Gilead. White Noise by Don Delillo and also The Names. The City & the City and Un Lun Dun by China de Mieville.

A recent delightful DVD: Young Victoria

the watercats said...

D.V.D'S: Deadman, House Of Fools, Calamity jane, Big Trail, and another one I can't remember the name of right now....

Clowncar said...

Denis Johnson - Tree of Smoke. His Nobody Move is wicked good noir as well.

As for DVD's, the Coen Bro's A Serious Man is very, very good. And I'm on a Nicole Holofcener kick now - Friends With Money, Lovely and Amazing, etc. She describes her films (and I'm sure I'm paraphrasing badly here) as a series of small moments leading to a slightly larger small moment.

ArtSparker said...

Hey guys- will definitely be updating my DVD list soon...

Nemo said...

Matthias At The Door by Edwin Arlington Robinson.