Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Learning and Leaving

This was my favorite in a series of seven illustrations I did for December's Berkeley Monthly. The essay was by a black woman who as a child learned to ride her bike from a white friend who was then told not to play with her. The essayist felt okay to move on with her new skill.

20 comments:

Rick said...

My father (raised Catholic) told me about the beating he once got for playing with a Protestant kid. He also told me about taking shit in the army for drinking with black guys. He didn't need a church or a book to tell him what was right. Neither should anyone else.

Cláudia said...

The white and black, the intersection of both, the ghostly aspect of the white figure, the cheerful face of the black girl (children do have a way to get over crises) - you are such a magician, Susan. This is outstanding!

Have a wonderful New Year's eve, you and your loved ones!
Cheers!

Cláudia said...

Hey, I was re-reading it, I think I got it wrong - the "who(s)" get tangled in my head.

The story is much more interesting now. Guess I read it too quick the first time (and with preconceived notions).

jasmine said...

Susan this illustration is fantastic. You Have captured the essence of the essay well, I'm sure the author loved it.

Asja said...

really great work! i love all the textures and layers!

justdoodleit said...

Overlapping those drawings gives it another meaningful dimension in the context of the story. Well, just my interpretation.

Totalfeckineejit said...

Brilliant storytelling there Sparkey, the White girl forlorn and static, the black girl joyous, speeding away with her new skill.Magico! And If I is not communing with you between now and then, Happy New Year!

Steve said...

Your picture captures it perfectly - poetry as illustration. Total success.

Susan at Stony River said...

I love that illustration -- it captures the spirit of the essay so well and tells a story all by itself. And it's lovely!

You've reminded me of a conversation I had with a friend this year, about how often the most powerful memories we have as children aren't even remembered by our own parents--which leaves us wondering what memories are shaping our own children, perhaps without our knowledge.

tony said...

You Cant Unteach Knowledge! Great Drawing Lady! Bestest To You For 2010 From Me!

mouse (aka kimy) said...

wonderful illustration!

happy new year susan!

Eric Barclay said...

Really wonderful illustration. Best wishes for the new year!

bindu said...

This is a great one - for the imagery and the idea behind it. I've been reading blogs very erratically and seem to have missed a lot of your posts. Will catch up. Have a great new year!

Ribbon said...

I like what you have portrayed here...

best wishes for the coming year

Mariana Soffer said...

What a beautifull ilustration you are really talented, i am delighted about it, I love artwork, specially drawings and paintings, I am curious now to know about your past artworks and things.

Cheers!

Celeste Bergin said...

THIS is why I have a deep respect for illustrators! This visual leads to an even deeper understanding for the story. A well thought out compliment to the essay. I am so impressed.

Dream Painter said...

everything in this is perfect! I particularly love the colours and line work, so elegant!

Happy new year!

California Girl said...

I can see why this is your favorite.

The concept sounds similar to a children's book I recently heard about called "The Other Side". I heard the author read it aloud and it's a WONDERFYL story about a town's white & black populations separated by a fence and the two little girls who become friends through the fence.

Gavin Goo said...

Love the composition in this. And love the idea of just using b&w line drawings for the cyclists.

Happy New Year to you Susan.

eyetrouble said...

Excellent artwork, as always.