Sunday, December 13, 2009

Relativity

This was a favorite joke of my brother's friend High School best friend Dave .

Outside of the States, a Yankee is someone from the United States

Inside the U.S., a Yankee is someone born North of the Mason-Dixon Line*

If you were born North of the Mason-Dixon Line, a Yankee is someone from New England

If you're a New Englander, a Yankee is someone from Maine

If you were born in Maine, a Yankee is someone who eats pie for breakfast.

To my Maine reader: Jess, if you read this, perhaps you can address its accuracy.

* For my foreign readers, The Mason-Dixon Line divides the North from the South, pretty much reflecting the divisions in the Civil War.

25 comments:

Caio Fernandes said...

pie for beakfast ?
huuummmm . this is a good adjetive .

ArtSparker said...

I see you like the Northern climate.

justdoodleit said...

So, would this qualify as Yankee doodle?

ArtSparker said...

jdi - stunned by the pun -

Susan at Stony River said...

This made me laugh-- we came to Ireland to live because it's my husband's home, and for the first time in my life I was called "Yankee". My great-grandfather was a true-blue Confederate, so you can imagine my response was less than polite!

But, I have been known to eat pie for breakfast... hmmm!

I *love* that Yankee Doodle comment! ROFL

Celeste Bergin said...

as soon as I saw the word Yankee...I thought of Maine. It is a term they use there a lot! I want pie for breakfast. Makes a lot of sense to me.

Eva said...

In Copenhagen, "Vienna Bread" is the same as a "Copenhagener" in Vienna: A kind of fluff pastry with some persipane inside and a sugar crust.

Coffee Messiah said...

I've often wondered about certain labels.

You can add this one to the box ; )

Cheers!

Bungy32 said...

In the South, calling someone a "Yankee" is almost never a compliment. I grew up in North Carolina (well south of the Mason Dixon line), but when I went to school in Louisiana, I was frequently called a "Yankee" by folks who felt NC wasn't "Southern" enough.

That said, I've had many a Southern breakfast that included pie (particularly fruit pie...most often fried fruit pie!)

And yes..."Yankee Doodle" deserves a prize!

steve said...

Oh yes, here in Northern VA they (used to) jokingly refer to me as a damn yankee, being from Pittsburgh, originally. Now there are so many of us who have migrated from that region to VA, it's to common now to even bother addressing us as yankees anymore.

Love the little drawing too btw!

femminismo said...

Let's always have pie for breakfast! So you know where that puts me, even though I've never been in Maine.

Totalfeckineejit said...

I eat humble pie, breakfast,lunch and dinner.

Tomás Serrano said...

Very funny!

Ribbon said...

that's an expression I haven't heard used in a long while.

here in Australia we tend to say Yank....

thanks for this little snippet of info :)

best wishes
Ribbon

bindu said...

So true! Before I came to the US I thought the first, and after I came here, I saw how there are so many layers to it!

Tammie Lee said...

relativity indeed!

Harnett-Hargrove said...

Great post! And, I do believe a Yankee to someone south of the M/D line is known as a 'damn Yankee'. -J

ArtSparker said...

HH - I thought that was how the baseball team was known in NYC.

Parisa said...

Great post,I learned something new.

Poet in Residence said...

In 1942/3 brave and handsome gum-masticating Yanks with spearmint breaths and pockets bursting with nylons, folding money and Lucky Strikes were in the UK preparing for the D-Day Landings and looking after those delicate but wilting roses, the fair and sadly lonely English girls whose men were already away in the War.
In those days "One Yank, and they're off," was often heard. Perhaps a Yank is small boat, a tug?

ArtSparker said...

Poet in Residence - The delicacy of that indelicate remark is something to contemplate.

Fresca said...

Should that be "blueberry pie"?

ArtSparker said...

Fresca - well-spotted!

The Crow said...

Oh, I thought it was mincemeat pie, which we used to eat for breakfast in the winter. I'm a southern-born Yankee - also known as a traitor to some in my family, because Pennsylvania is now my home.

Susan, I love your art! Always a joy to visit here.

:)

jasmine said...

Sounds like the Watford Gap...
Local notions can be amusing.